Posts Tagged ‘jab#8217;

5
Jun

IE University gathers its Junior Advisory Board

Written on June 5, 2013 by Roberto Arribas in General, Highlights

JAB 2013IE University is holding until Friday June 7 the fifth meeting of the International Junior Advisory Board, a committee of fifteen pre-university students from South Africa, Germany, United Kingdom, Zimbabwe, Macedonia, Czech Republic, India, Canada, Slovenia, Iraq, Italy and Taiwan. The campus of Santa Cruz la Real de Segovia and the IE headquarters in Madrid are the places where the council is meeting in order to propose ways to improve education.

These are young talents selected by IE University among students from more than one hundred schools in Africa, America, Asia and Europe through the twenty-five international offices IE maintains worldwide. The fifteen boys and girls have in common an extraordinary academic profile, mastering several languages ​​and special competence in different disciplines. During their stay in Spain, students bring to the academic authorities of the university their views on the future of higher education in a global world that is becoming increasingly competitive and cosmopolitan.

During their stay, they will attend various workshops and classes taught by recognized experts and teachers of IE, as well as leisure activities to explore the Spanish culture and various excursions to the cities of Segovia and Madrid. The young fifteen finally submit a report of findings on the landscape of education, highlighting those aspects that should be improved in order for the university to adapt to their needs and concerns.

(Spanish Version)

2013-06-04 09.43.20-4IE University reúne a su Consejo Asesor Junior

 IE University celebra hasta el próximo viernes 7 de junio la quinta reunión de su Consejo Asesor Junior Internacional , un comité integrado por quince estudiantes preuniversitarios procedentes de Sudáfrica, Alemania, Reino Unido, Zimbabue, Macedonia, Chequia, India, Canadá, Eslovenia, Iraq, Italia y Taiwan. El campus de Santa Cruz la Real de Segovia y la sede de IE en Madrid son los lugares donde este consejo se reúne con el fin de hacer propuestas para la mejora de la educación universitaria. 

Son jóvenes talentos seleccionados por IE University entre alumnos de más de un centenar de colegios de África, América, Asia y Europa a través de las veinticinco oficinas internacionales que IE mantiene en todo el mundo. Los quince chicos y chicas tienen en común un perfil académico extraordinario, el dominio de varias lenguas y una especial competencia en distintas disciplinas. Durante su estancia en España, los estudiantes aportarán a las autoridades académicas de la universidad su opinión sobre el futuro de la educación superior en un mundo global  cada vez más competitivo y cosmopolita.  

Durante su estancia, asistirán a diversos talleres y clases impartidas por reconocidos expertos y profesores de IE, además de realizar actividades de ocio para conocer la cultura española y distintas excursiones por las ciudades de Segovia y Madrid. Los quince jóvenes, finalmente, presentarán un informe de conclusiones sobre el panorama de la Educación, resaltado aquellos aspectos que se deben de mejorar con el fin de que la universidad se adapte a sus necesidades e inquietudes

30
Mar

Interview with Richard Winchell (EE.UU.), member of JAB

Written on March 30, 2012 by Roberto Arribas in General

From March 27th to March 30th 2012, IE University’s Junior Advisory Board will hold its fourth annual meeting. Founded in 2009, organized and promoted by IE School of Arts and Humanities, Junior Advisory Board is a highly selective group of pre-university students, aged from 16 to 18, who advise IE University about the future of university education.

Interview with Richard Winchell (EE.UU.), member of JAB

How did you hear about JAB and what motivated you to take part in it?

I got involved with JAB after my father, a member of the International Advisory Board, suggested I apply. What really appealed to me was the truly international nature of the school. Also, it gave me an opportunity to travel to one of the most storied cities in all of Europe.  

What is the greatest challenge you are looking forward to on your future university?

I am looking forward to living independently; being an adult. I want to be able to take full responsibility and control of my own life, and college is really the first time where I can attempt to do so.  

Which aspects of your chosen university career interest you most and why?

Currently, I am still debating whether to pursue a career in Economics or Political Science. However, what interest me in both cases is the conceptual aspects of the economy and government, respectively. Both are integral components of a functioning society, and regardless of which I do decide to pursue, I would like to be able to demonstrate some form of mastery over both.  

What particular qualities do you believe a future leader should have?

A future leader should be smart, administrative, charismatic, devoted, and virtuous. The truly great leaders – Abraham Lincoln, Augustus Caesar, Charlemagne etc. – have all exemplified these qualities. However, the most important quality is an ability to stand steadfast in the face of adversity.

What do you find most valuable when choosing your university?

When I visit schools, the two things I always look at first are the quality of education, and the quality of student life. If the school provides a poor education, then it will not serve its primary objective of preparing its students be successful in their pursuits. However, no matter how great the education is, the quality of life for the student is equally important; four years of misery are not worth a great education.

30
Mar

Interview with Yvonne Cantarero Sanchez (Spain), member of JAB

Written on March 30, 2012 by Roberto Arribas in General

From March 27th to March 30th 2012, IE University’s Junior Advisory Board will hold its fourth annual meeting. Founded in 2009, organized and promoted by IE School of Arts and Humanities, Junior Advisory Board is a highly selective group of pre-university students, aged from 16 to 18, who advise IE University about the future of university education.

Interview with Yvonne Cantarero Sanchez (Spain), member of JAB

How did you hear about JAB and what motivated you to take part in it?

My mother is a member of the IE community. She was the one who told me about the program. I believe this a great opportunity for me to meet people from all over the world and be able to learn from each other. I find this opportunity very enriching, culturally speaking, and I look forward to meeting the rest the JAB members. 

What is the greatest challenge you are looking forward to on your future university?

I look forward to successfully merging with people who have different views and ideas than me, considering our differences in our cultural backgrounds. I think this experience will help me expand my horizons. 

Which aspects of your chosen university career interest you most and why?

In the future I plan on working within fields where I would be able to fully utilize my language skills. Therefore I wish to enroll in an international affairs major to further develop my knowledge within past, present and future cultural issues. 

What particular qualities do you believe a future leader should have?

A leader must be willing to sacrifice everything for their goal. A successful leader must be fully devoted to their cause. Turning back the hands of time, one would come across the bravery of leaders like Martin Luther King. By sacrificing his safety in advocating for African American rights, Martin Luther King was truly a leader of his generation. Success can only be reached through leadership that comes at the cost of sacrifice.

What do you find most valuable when choosing your university?

While going through college applications, I always keep in mind that the most important thing is my learning environment. Considering I will be living in that environment for at least four years, I always check the amount of international students each institution has. I strongly believe that a university with a high amount of international students is a place where all opinions are taken into consideration.

29
Mar

Interview with Monika Filipovska (Slovenia), member of JAB

Written on March 29, 2012 by Roberto Arribas in General

From March 27th to March 30th 2012, IE University’s Junior Advisory Board will hold its fourth annual meeting. Founded in 2009, organized and promoted by IE School of Arts and Humanities, Junior Advisory Board is a highly selective group of pre-university students, aged from 16 to 18, who advise IE University about the future of university education.

Interview with Monika Filipovska (Slovenia), member of JAB 

How did you hear about JAB and what motivated you to take part in it? 

I first heard about IE University’s junior Advisory Board on a presentation we had at school about IE University and from our school’s International Baccalaureate Coordinator.  I was impressed of this idea because it really shows that the University actually aims to understand and appreciate the opinions of those who are to build the university as such – the future part. And I, as a person striving to become a knowledgeable, experienced and educated life-long learner, I understand that the university is there to build us as persons as much as we are there to build the university into a real educational institution. I know that I want to study at a university that will give me a chance to grow and that will give me the knowledge I want in a way that is most appropriate for me. 

What is the greatest challenge you are looking forward to on your future university?

In my opinion, my future university should be the institution to grow me into a thinker, knower and creator on a global level. So, I’m looking forward to exaggerating my own limits and explore my talents, help my shape my professional profile, my role in the world, afterwards. And the most challenging part, after all, is the fact that my future university is supposed to give me the world on a glance, to make me explore it and understand it and then be prepared to live and work in it. 

Which aspects of your chosen university career interest you most and why?

 I can say that my academic interests are really broad. Firstly, I think that economics plays a quite important role in this world of developments, and every person, no matter what they study, should be familiar to the basics of economics, because we all have to then, later on, find our places in the economy of the 21st century. But, one also has to consider that this has to be a lot more shaped around critical thinking development of the person’s creativity. And of course, my studies after all have to be globally-leveled, because being acquainted with the world’s functioning as a whole is crucial. 

What particular qualities do you believe a future leader should have?

 We know that a leader is someone who has the ability to give ideas, listen to people’s opinions and lead them as a group towards a marked goal. But what is also very important is that a leader needs to have the ability to confront complex problems, ask the right questions and create solutions. And the ability to create is the most empowering thing that can happen to an individual.
Thus, when we talk of leaders, we talk of all these educated people who are about to create the world. 

What do you find most valuable when choosing your university?

I’m expecting from a university to offer me education. And this process of educating is not just learning and gaining knowledge, understanding what we learn, taking new perspectives towards the world and life. Education is much more than this. These things that are taught at schools and colleges are just means of education, just the things that have to contribute to our education, to help us gain education. Education, actually, is a long process of self-building, where by means of gaining knowledge, learning and understanding, one is shaping their perspectives towards the world, establishing themselves as a part of the moving and developing environment they live in, a way of individual development. That’s what I value when choosing a university. I want it to educate me.

29
Mar

Interview with Monica Brova (Romania), member of JAB

Written on March 29, 2012 by Roberto Arribas in General

From March 27th to March 30th 2012, IE University’s Junior Advisory Board will hold its fourth annual meeting. Founded in 2009, organized and promoted by IE School of Arts and Humanities, Junior Advisory Board is a highly selective group of pre-university students, aged from 16 to 18, who advise IE University about the future of university education.

Interview with Monica Brova (Romania), member of JAB

How did you hear about JAB and what motivated you to take part in it?

I first heard about JAB from my school’s college advisors, who encouraged me to apply and supported my application. After they told me a little about JAB and I read more on the IE website, I was captivated by the innovative idea of a university allowing high school students to voice their ideas and expectations of higher education. Realizing what an unparalleled opportunity this would be to learn about university life and education, I was motivated to apply. 

What is the greatest challenge you are looking forward to on your future university?

I am most looking forward to coming to know myself better and growing as a person as a result of the responsibility I will take on in university, particularly that of living and studying independently in a new and unfamiliar setting and taking charge of my own learning and career path. 

Which aspects of your chosen university career interest you most and why?

I am most interested in developing my interests and passions in humanities subjects as well as psychology and biology. I think this path will answer a lot of my questions and topics I am curious about, and help me better understand the world and current events. Furthermore, I am enthusiastic about learning from and working with individuals with many backgrounds and interests at university.                       

What particular qualities do you believe a future leader should have?

I believe that a leader should be first and foremost a good communicator, a prolific speaker and listener with an open mind. Having a vision of what needs to be achieved and how to go about it is vital, but a true leader must be able to communicate these ideas as well as address and incorporate the ideas and opinions of others. 

What do you find most valuable when choosing your university?

I find the flexibility of the majors and courses offered at university a very important factor, particularly the ability to integrate both humanities and science courses within a major at undergraduate level. I am passionate about many topics under both the humanities and sciences, and I hope for a university education that encourages interdisciplinary learning.