7
Nov

THE ARCHITECTURE OF MANAGEMENT EDUCATION

Written on November 7, 2011 by Roberto Arribas in Events, General, Learning Activities

(Source: Saïd Business School, University of Oxford) 

El profesor Paolo Quattrone, investigador asociado del Instituto de Ciencia, Innovación y Sociedad (INSIS) y Marc Ventresca, miembro de INSIS y profesor de Estrategia en la Saïd Business School, fueron los co-organizadores de una conferencia de investigación sobre “Espacios de Aprendizaje: Los campos de la organización, prácticas de aprendizaje y la arquitectura para la innovación social en la educación y más allá” que tuvo lugar a mediados de septiembre.

La conferencia reunió a veinticinco investigadores, arquitectos y expertos en diseño e innovación en el campus de la IE University en Segovia, para desarrollar un manifiesto y una agenda de investigación para examinar la relación entre la arquitectura y la entrega de la educación de gestión. 

  THE ARCHITECTURE OF MANAGEMENT EDUCATION

Professor Paolo Quattrone, Associate Fellow at the Institute of Science, Innovation and Society (InSIS) and InSIS Fellow Marc Ventresca, University Lecturer in Strategy at Saïd, served as co-convenors for a research conference on ‘Learning Spaces: Organizational fields, knowing practices and architecture for social innovation in education and beyond’ that took place in mid-September.

The conference brought together twenty-five researchers, architects, and design and innovation experts at the Segovia, Spain campus of IE University to develop a manifesto and research agenda to examine the relationship between architecture and the delivery of management education.

‘The point of this conference was to highlight in public conversation the debates around changes in the organization and structuring of physical and virtual spaces in business and higher education’ said Professor Quattrone. ‘Management schools sit at this intersection of institutions.  We had a fantastic surge of interest from colleagues at the workshop and since, as they have spoken with others and begin to build an international research network on these topics.’

The recent rise of dramatic and visible business school buildings by architects like Gehry and others were featured in plenary panels alongside sessions and papers on emerging virtual and digital technologies for learning, current experiments in management school pedagogy and formats, and on the lessons from 16th c Jesuit ideologies of control and organization.  One panel featured perspectives on Saïd Business School’s building and shifting design approaches to the interplay of city and university. 

Delegates were treated to a tour of the Segovia IE campus by a noted historian — the now renovated buildings of the Dominican order closely allied with the Spanish Crown of the 15th century, with commercial interests, and with the leadership of the Spanish Inquisition.  Quattrone added, ‘The renovation of the these buildings for the Segovia campus itself is a telling physical account of the continuity of the precepts of the Early Modern religious Orders and contemporary University education.  There is so much to learn about what we think of contemporary universities by just looking at the organization of the space in these old institutions’.

The conference concluded with an agenda to develop research, publications, and a future conference, likely to be held in Oxford in 2012.  ‘This focus on Learning Spaces pivots much current debate about the relevance and instrumental value of management education,’ according to Ventresca.  ‘Instead, the papers and presentations gave primacy to the content of management learning, the pedagogy and practices both conventional and innovative that shape the experience of MBAs and others. We refocused also on the de facto ‘theories’ of learning and professional practice embodied in the new architecture of business schools.’  

Delegates from Spain, Italy, UK, Sweden, and the US participated in the workshop which was funded by the Governance, Accountability and Innovation (GAIN) research programme at InSIS, from the Vice-Rector Office for Research at IE University, and from the Spanish Ministry of Education.

LEARNING SPACES AND THE ARCHITECTURE OF MANAGEMENT EDUCATION 

Veinticinco investigadores, arquitectos y expertos en diseño e innovación se reunieron en el campus de IE University en Segovia a mediados del pasado mes de septiembre para elaborar un manifiesto y lanzar un programa de investigación sobre “Espacios de Aprendizaje: Los campos de la organización, prácticas de aprendizaje y la arquitectura para la innovación social en la educación y más allá”. El objetivo de esta conferencia fue poner de relieve en la conversación pública los debates sobre los cambios en la organización y estructuración de los espacios físicos y virtuales en los negocios y la educación superior.  

Los delegados que participaron en el taller vinieron de España, Italia, Reino Unido, Suecia y los EE.UU. El taller fue patrocinado por   el programa de investigación en INSIS Governance, Accountability and Innovation (GAIN), el Vicerrectorado de Investigación de IE University, y el Ministerio de Educación de España. 

Twenty-five researchers, architects, and design and innovation experts convened at the Segovia, Spain campus of IE University in mid-September to develop a manifesto and research agenda for ‘Learning Spaces: Organizational fields, knowing practices and architecture for social innovation in education and beyond.’  Co-convenors included Prof Paolo Quattrone, Associate Fellow at the Institute for Science, Innovation, and Society (InSIS) and Professor of Management Control at IE Business School in Madrid, and Dr Marc Ventresca, University Lecturer in Strategy and InSIS Fellow.  ‘The point of this conference was to highlight in public conversation the debates around changes in the organisation and structuring of physical and virtual spaces in business and higher education.   Management schools sit at this intersection of institutions.  We had a fantastic surge of interest from colleagues at the Workshop and since, as they have spoken with others and begin to build an international research network on these topics.’

The research conference featured plenary panels and individual papers about the recent set of dramatic and visible business school buildings by architects like Gehry and others, overviews of emerging virtual and digital technologies for learning, current experiments in management school pedagogy and formats, and on the lessons from 16th c Jesuit ideologies of control and organization.  On the programme were faculty in organization theory, accounting, and architecture, historians and literature scholars, practicing architects and organization design consultants, digital and learning theorists, and researchers in the sociology of knowledge and in higher education studies.  One panel featured perspectives on the Saïd Business School building and shifting design approaches to the interplay of city and university.  In addition, delegates had a tour of the Segovia IE campus by a noted historian — the now renovated buildings of the Dominican order closely allied with the Spanish Crown of the 15th century, with commercial interests, and with the leadership of the Spanish Inquisition.  Quattrone added, ‘The renovation of the these buildings for the Segovia campus itself is a telling physical account of the continuity of the precepts of the Early Modern religious Orders and contemporary University education.  There is so much to learn about what we think of contemporary universities by just looking at the organization of the space in these old institutions’.

The conference concluded with an agenda to develop research, publications, and a future conference, likely to be held in Oxford in 2012.  ‘This focus on Learning Spaces pivots much current debate about the relevance and instrumental value of management education,’ according to Ventresca.  ‘Instead, the papers and presentations gave primacy to the content of management learning, the pedagogy and practices both conventional and innovative that shape the experience of MBAs and others. We refocused also on the de facto ‘theories’ of learning and professional practice embodied in the new architecture of business schools.’  

Delegates participated in the workshop from Spain, Italy, UK, Sweden, and the US.   Funding for the Workshop was from the Governance, Accountability and Innovation (GAIN) research programme at InSIS, from the Vice-Rector Office for Research at IE University, and from the Spanish Ministry of Education.

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